News

Shorter Sleepers Are Over-Eaters

Children who sleep less found to eat more

Young children who sleep less eat more, which can lead to obesity and related health problems later in life, reports a new study by UCL researchers.

The study found that 16 month-old children who slept for less than 10 hours each day consumed on average 105kcal more per day than children who slept for more than 13 hours. This is an increase of around 10% from 982kcal to 1087kcal.

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5 Tips To Help You Work More Effectively

“Rarely have I seen a situation where doing less than the other practitioner is a good strategy.

A counter intuitive but effective method for increasing productivity is to limit how many items you add to your to-do list.

The list is the origin of culture. Wherever you look in cultural history, you will find lists. – Umberto Eco

A simple way to do this is by choosing one to three Most Important Tasks, (MITs). These are the big, often hard tasks for your day that you really need to get done; the ones that will drag your time at work on for too long. Then break these down into 2 or 3 smaller easy to complete sections.

This means do the important things first – regardless of how hard they are. Then focus only on today.

The rest of your to-do list can be composed with minor tasks that you would do as long as you complete your MITs. Make sure you work on those before you move on to less critical tasks and you’ll find you feel a whole lot more productive at the end of the day.

One valuable tip that can reduce work anxiety is to write your to-do list the night before. Writing a to-do list before you go to bed helps you relax and sleep better and in the morning your tasks are clearly set out..

Also separate your “today” list from the master list of everything you need to get done.

A solution is to make a big list of everything you need to do. Then, every night, move a few things to your to-do list for the next day.

Remember your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.” Park your ideas on your to-do list, but make sure you create a “today” list and a “someday” list. That way you won’t waste energy trying to remember important ideas and you’ll ensure today won’t feel overwhelming.

One way to do this is to adjust the way you measure productivity. If you evaluate yourself by what you actually get done rather than the time it takes to get something done, you’ll start to notice a difference in how you work.

For example, if you have a big project to complete, try breaking it down into small but discrete sections, so each one can be crossed off as they are completed, until the whole task is done.

This aspect of completion really helps with the idea that you are progressing through the days needs.

If I don’t have a plan for what to work on first, procrastination can creep in and time will be wasted One way to overcome this problem is building a regular routine that tells your brain and body it’s time to work.

Routines aren’t a sign of boring, regimented people. Routines are a sign of people who have goals and have found the best way–for them–to actually accomplish their goals.

If you’re struggling to be productive, it’s tempting to change your routine or try new solutions before you uncover the real problem. The first step in becoming more productive is to identify your regular time wasting events. Start by tracking what you do every morning to get ready for work. You might find you’re spending time on things such as choosing your clothes, something you could do the night before.

Then, keep going: Track how you spend your time during the day and look for patterns. Maybe you’ll find you’re getting caught up on social media too often. Or that what should have been a two-minute work conversation regularly turns into a 10-minute chat session.

Once you know what takes up your time or leads you to procrastinate, start making specific changes around those habits.

This one might seem a bit strange, but it really works. Creating a daily deadline makes you focus and commit to completing the task and avoiding over run.

It’s easy to just keep going for another hour, or to get your computer out after dinner and work until well after bedtime. The worst thing about these habits is that they encourage us to put off our MITs; we figure we’ll be working long enough to be sure to get them done. (But, of course, we don’t.)

Here are a few ways to switch on at-home time and leave work behind:

Another benefit of a strict cut-off time is you’ll be a lot more motivated to complete your MITs first; the pressure of a looming deadline will help keep you focused.

Paleo Cookery Day

Cookery Day and Product Workshop
 

Paleo Cookery Day with Christine Bailey & Antony Haynes

With over 50% of the UK population overweight or obese and the rise in long term chronic diseases including diabetes many people are looking for a long term eating approach to lose weight and tackle ongoing health conditions. The Paleo diet or ‘caveman’ diet is increasing in popularity as a long term anti-inflammatory eating programme but as with many diets there are healthy and not so healthy ‘approaches’. Christine Bailey will share with you a delicious range of healthy, easy to prepare Paleo recipes. She will share with you information on how to implement a healthy Paleo eating regime, which foods to include and those to avoid. She will also provide you with practical tips to help people stick to the programme and avoid pitfalls of the diet as well as tailoring the diet to their individual food choices.

As this diet is often followed by people wishing to lower inflammation and modulate the immune response.

Antony Haynes will share with you supplement information to accompany the programme to maximise the benefits of the programme.

 

About the Presenters

Antony Haynes BA Dip ION
A highly experienced Nutritional Therapist and author, Antony has evolved a very successful general practice utilising the functional medicine principles and practices to great effect. Well known for his delivery and oratory style, he brings real life examples to life and helps to explain how he faces decisions in practice with a measured and assured approach to generate enthusiasm and health optimisation.

Christine Bailey MSc MBANT
Christine is a well known nutritional therapist and chef with an expertise in allergy free and gluten free cooking and was awarded Coeliac Chef of the Year 2008 as well as being author of numerous recipe and health books including the forthcoming Functional Nutrition Cookbook (co-authored with Lorraine Nicolle). She provides regular nutritional support for Nutri Link on Linked In and at conferences and seminars.

To Book please click here
Book Now

Or call Claire on 08450 760 402.

Vitamin D Deficiency May Compromise Immune Function

Vitamin-deficient older adults more likely to have biomarkers for heart disease, inflammation

It appears, albeit without any great surprise based on the many years of vitamin D research that has occurred, that older individuals who are vitamin D deficient also tend to have compromised immune function, according to new research accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). [1]

Vitamin D plays an important role in helping the body absorb calcium needed for healthy bones. The skin naturally produces vitamin D when it is exposed to sunlight. People also obtain smaller amounts of the vitamin through foods, such as milk fortified with vitamin D. More than 1 billion people worldwide are estimated to have deficient levels of vitamin D due to limited sunshine exposure.

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Sugar – The WHO and Tensions!

Scientists are gearing up for a battle with the food industry after the World Health Organization (WHO) moved to halve its recommendation on sugar intake.

Nutrition researchers fear a backlash similar to that seen in 2003, when the WHO released its current guidelines stating that no more than 10% of an adult’s daily calories should come from ‘free’ sugars. That covers those added to food, as well as natural sugars in honey, syrups and fruit juice. In 2003, the US Sugar Association, a powerful food-industry lobby group based in Washington DC, pressed the US government to withdraw funding for the WHO if the organisation did not modify its recommendations. The WHO did not back down, and has now mooted cutting the level to 5%.

“These are reasonable limits,” says Walter Willett, head of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts. “Five per cent of calories is just a bit less than in a typical serving of soda, and we have good evidence of increased risk of diabetes with that intake, which of course increases with greater intake.”

Yet the sugar and food industry see this as a direct attack on their profit margins and no doubt a lot of consumers will see this as an attack on their freedom of choice – after all if they want to eat themselves to an early grave why shouldn’t they – or at least that is the siren call of the person who has jumped of the cliff but has yet to crash into the ground – we all know that once ill people mostly want all the help they mistakenly believe will allow them to continue digging their grave with fork and spoon.

Be prepared for lots of noise – but this is the right way to go – sugar ‘pure white and deadly’ has been under the radar of the average consumer for far too long.

Feeding Gut Microbiota: Nutrition & Probiotics Are Key Factors For Digestive Health

“Diet is a central issue when it comes to preserving our gastrointestinal health, because by eating and digesting we literally feed our gut microbiota, and thus influence its diversity and composition,” says the distinguished microbiota expert Professor Francisco Guarner (University Hospital Valld’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain).

If this balance is disturbed, it might result in a number of disorders, including functional bowel disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases and other immune mediated diseases, such as coeliac disease and certain allergies. Also, metabolic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, and perhaps even behavioural disorders, such as autism and depression, can be linked to gut microbial imbalances. Although a disrupted microbial equilibrium can have many causes — infectious pathogens or use of antibiotics among them — the role of our daily food and lifestyle is crucial. Thus, the maintenance of our gastrointestinal health is to a considerable extent in our own hands.

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Vitamin A Makes the Gut Headlines

In terms of the immune response in humans nutrients have a very important role to play and none more so than vitamin A. a lack of vitamin A results in altered intestinal immune homeostasis. This essential micronutrient supports adaptive immunity through its metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), which is highly enriched in the gastrointestinal tract.

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Paleo Cookery Day

Cookery Day and Product Workshop
 

Paleo Cookery Day with Christine Bailey

With over 50% of the UK population overweight or obese and the rise in long term chronic diseases including diabetes many people are looking for a long term eating approach to lose weight and tackle ongoing health conditions. The Paleo diet or ‘caveman’ diet is increasing in popularity as a long term anti-inflammatory eating programme but as with many diets there are healthy and not so healthy ‘approaches’. Christine Bailey will share with you a delicious range of healthy, easy to prepare Paleo recipes. She will share with you information on how to implement a healthy Paleo eating regime, which foods to include and those to avoid. She will also provide you with practical tips to help people stick to the programme and avoid pitfalls of the diet as well as tailoring the diet to their individual food choices.

As this diet is often followed by people wishing to lower inflammation and modulate the immune response.

Antony Haynes will share with you supplement information to accompany the programme to maximise the benefits of the programme.

 

About the Presenters

Antony Haynes BA Dip ION
A highly experienced Nutritional Therapist and author, Antony has evolved a very successful general practice utilising the functional medicine principles and practices to great effect. Well known for his delivery and oratory style, he brings real life examples to life and helps to explain how he faces decisions in practice with a measured and assured approach to generate enthusiasm and health optimisation.

Christine Bailey MSc MBANT
Christine is a well known nutritional therapist and chef with an expertise in allergy free and gluten free cooking and was awarded Coeliac Chef of the Year 2008 as well as being author of numerous recipe and health books including the forthcoming Functional Nutrition Cookbook (co-authored with Lorraine Nicolle). She provides regular nutritional support for Nutri Link on Linked In and at conferences and seminars.

To Book please click here
Book Now

Or call Claire on 08450 760 402.

Here Comes The Sun – How Vitamin D Relaxes Blood Vessels

It’s not just your mood that the dark months of winter can influence. Low levels of sunlight also mean lower levels of vitamin D in the body. Vitamin D deficiency can trigger a range of diseases but until recently little was known about the exact biological mechanisms behind this. A research team at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna has now decrypted one of these unknown molecular mechanisms. Vitamin D regulates the elasticity of blood vessels and thus also affects blood pressure amplitude. The results were published earlier this year in the journal Molecular Endocrinology.[1]

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Tocotrienols And Their Many Benefits.

Prof. Dr Chandan a world expert on the role of tocotrienols and their role in health presented a short presentation in 2013 on the many benefits that can be attributed to the ingestion of Tocotrienols, we have discussed the interesting role of these vitamin E rich fats for the management of risk/prevention and recovery. In particular the reduction of stroke risk and the restoration of liver quality in people with fatty liver diseases or even greater risk of liver failure. Watch his presentation.

A recently published study that shows the synergistic effect of oral supplementation of d-mixed tocotrienols and alpha-tocopherol in improving non-alcoholic steatohepatitis rats. Non-alcoholic steatohepatits (NASH) is the most extreme form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), resulting from the accumulation of triglycerides/fats (fatty liver), oxidative stress and inflammatory in the liver.

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