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s13379569Dec 2013 saw a paper published in Interdisciplinary Toxicology that explored the notion that the popular herbicide called Roundup may have a relational link to its increased use.[1] In addition a number of other complex and distressing health conditions have been are increasingly attributed to this chemical.

Glyphosate was not originally designed as a herbicide. Patented by the Stauffer Chemical Company in 1964, it was introduced as a chelating agent. It avidly binds to metals. Glyphosate was first used as a descaling agent to clean out mineral deposits from the pipes in boilers and other hot water systems.

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journal.jpgIt has been proposed that risk for developing the autoimmune condition coeliac disease (CD) may be linked to the time that the infant is weaned to consume gluten containing foods. However, the timing of gluten introduction into an infant’s diet does not appear to influence a child’s subsequent risk of developing CD investigators report in an article published online January 19 in Pediatrics.[1] The new finding, from a multinational prospective birth cohort study, challenges some current ideas on how best to prevent the onset of the autoimmune disorder.

logoIt’s always a challenge to take a single, isolated nutrient and try to prove a health benefit within a research study. Unlike drugs, which mostly have a clear mode of action on their own, nutrients generally usually work synergistically with other nutrients and lifestyle factors to generate health benefits. So when a meta-analysis (review of multiple studies) of one vitamin all show a similar clinical outcome, it is a significant finding and offers some clarity on the use of a nutrient in isolation as well as in combination with others.

JAND_v115_i1_COVER.inddDo it.

Just one cup of blueberries per day could be the key to reducing blood pressure and arterial stiffness, both of which are associated with cardiovascular disease.

The studies findings suggest that regular consumption of blueberries could potentially delay the progression of prehypertension to hypertension, therefore reducing cardiovascular disease risk.[1]

13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

Tuesday, 13 January 2015 by | Comments: 1

13thingscoverPublished in the UK Sunday Times on the 28th Dec 2014 and written by Ami Morin these are 13 things that mentally strong people work on achieving, it may be that some of these elements are aspects that NTs would find helpful or supportive.

coverThere are trillions of microorganisms in the human microbiome — they outnumber their host’s cells substantially — and their exact role in health and disease is only now starting to be explored. Studies have found that people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have a different composition of bacteria in their gut from healthy individuals.[1],[2] However, it is as yet impossible to say why or what direct effect this has. Whatever the reason, changes in the microbiome are unlikely sufficient to cause disease. Instead, an emerging picture of liver disease and cancer sees their development as a process in which various factors — including a high-fat diet, alcoholism, genetic susceptibility and the microbiome — can each contribute to the progression from minor to severe liver damage, and from severe liver damage to cancer.

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The remedies for gastrointestinal complaints are legion and stretch back far in human history. Ancient Chinese physicians prescribed anise for flatulence, while Dioscorides, chief physician for the Roman army, recommended garlic for parasites. Many are effective and stand the test of time, but contemporary scientific research on novel extracts offers up surprising new finds. The Asian plant, Perilla (Perilla frutescens) for example, offers valuable assistance in the management of functional gut problems.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is a chronic inflammation of the small intestine and colon caused by a dysregulated immune response to host intestinal microbiota in genetically susceptible subjects. A number of fermented dairy products contain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria, some of which have been characterised as probiotics that can modify the gut microbiota and may be beneficial for the treatment and the prevention of IBD.

The objective of this review was to carry out a systematic search of LAB and bifidobacteria probiotics and IBD, using the PubMed and Scopus databases, defined by a specific equation using MeSH terms and limited to human clinical trials. The use of probiotics and/or synbiotics has positive effects in the treatment and maintenance of UC, whereas in CD clear effectiveness has only been shown for synbiotics.

This seminar information explores the traditional model of calories in vs calories out as the explanation for weight gain, and identifies the flaws of this model. The seminar focuses on the biological addictive nature of the Western diet and sugar and how addiction determines food choice and caloric intake. It is possible that being fat makes you hungry, but there is also evidence that being hungry makes you fat. Learn about the role of the microbiome’s in metabolism. The influence of environmental toxins is explored and how this affects fat stores. Genetics play a role, but epigenetics is more significant in weight issues.

(2014) Antony Haynes & Christine Bailey: FODMAPS

Wednesday, 12 November 2014 by

This seminar focuses on the increasingly popular low FODMAPs diet which has been identified as a short term eating plan for resolving symptoms of IBS. The seminar teaches you about what the low FODMAPs Diet is, and what it means in terms of food restrictions but also what alternative foods to eat. There is a review of the published papers on the topic, highlighting features, benefits and possible issues arising from the diet. Mechanisms are explored. You will also learn about fructose malabsorption and lactose intolerance. Methods of testing are discussed and explored. Learn about how to support and correct the underlying gut imbalances in those individuals who benefit from a low FODMAPs diet. Receive practical advice to help implement a low FODMAPs diet with clients, and how to conduct the recommended re-introduction programme with clear step by step guidelines to follow. Receive an information booklet / patient handout giving details of the low FODMAPs diet, menu example and the most recent information on foods to avoid, with suitable alternatives including recipes and advice on reading labels and eating out.

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