Abstracts

Apples, Inducers of Eubiosis Driven Weight Management

Apples; great for SCFA production, restoring bacterial eubiosis in a disrupted gut and likely able to assist with weight management, say scientists in the journal Food Chemistry.[1] Apples, in general, have shown to protect against human chronic diseases due to their content of fibre and phenolic compounds. These bioactive compounds have low availability and can potentially reach to colon, modulate the balance of bacterial populations in the gut, and influence the host physiology. The apple health benefits are, in part, due to the interaction of fibre and phenolics with gut microbiota that results in changes in phenolic bioavailability and activity, and the production of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) after fibre fermentation.

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Ginger Vs Migraines Compared to Medication

The journal Phytotherapy Research published an interesting article exploring the use of ginger as a treatment for migraine and comparing it to the commonly prescribed medication sumatriptan – the results are encouraging for those seeking non drug based interventions.

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Efficacy of Vitamin C as an Adjunct to Fluoxetine Therapy in Paediatric Major Depressive Disorder

A paper out in the Journal of Nutrition raises an interesting notion that augmentation of Fluoextine in paediatric patients may well enhance the clinical outcomes. Putting aside for one moment the increasing challenges faced by anti-depressants to be validated as a worthwhile therapy in mild to moderate depression, plus their numerous side effect it raises an interesting possibility.[1] A safe oral supplement of ascorbates may either biochemically or circumstantially enhance recovery in young patients and that is something worth considering.[2]

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Efficacy and Safety of Saccharomyces Boulardii for Acute Diarrhea.

Saccharomyces is a non-colonising yeast used for the last 70 plus years as a therapeutic agent for the relief and management of gastrointestinal distress. Whilst its community use as a by-product of lychee fermentation was well understood in indo china and other nations, in particular for the relief of choleric dysentery it was after Henri Boulard set up the French pharmaceutical company to exploit its potential that studies began. So the recent publication (July 2014) of a review paper in the well known journal Pediatrics is a helpful means of qualifying its use in the paediatric population[1]

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Fish Oil Supplements Reduce Incidence of Cognitive Decline, Brain Atrophy

Regular use of fish oil supplements (FOS) was associated with a significant reduction in cognitive decline and brain atrophy in older adults, according to a study published early online ahead of the print edition of the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia.[1]

The study examined the relationship between FOS use and indicators of cognitive decline during the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI)

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Perilla Extract (Benegut®) Improves IBS symptoms

A study published in the BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine Journal identifies a number of benefits and improved function, achieved in people with IBS ( a functional loss of tolerance in the GI Tract) when consuming a 300mg daily dose of Perilla Extract.[1]

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What You Eat May Affect Your Body’s Internal Biological Clock

Source : Cell Press

Food not only nourishes the body but also affects its internal biological clock, which regulates the daily rhythm of many aspects of human behaviour and biology. Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports provide new insights into how adjusting the clock through dietary manipulation may help patients with various conditions and show that insulin may be involved in resetting the clock.[1]

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Vit C For Heart Health

In a paper published in the journal Atherosclerosis, the authors of the published article – Effect of vitamin C on endothelial function in health and disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.[1]  identified a specific improvement in one aspect related to arterial/vascular health, namely endothelial function.

The normal artery contains three layers. The inner layer, the tunica intima, is lined by a monolayer of endothelial cells (EC) that is in contact with blood. The middle layer, or tunica media, contains smooth muscle cells embedded in a complex extracellular matrix. The adventitia, the outer layer of artery, contains mast cells, nerve endings and microvessels. The direct contact of ECs with the blood flow means that they are particularly vulnerable to damage molecules in the blood on one hand, and that they have ideally “guard” roles on the other hand (i.e., sensing alterations in perfusate constituents and either responding directly or transmitting reactive signals to nearby cells, such as smooth vascular cells).

Consequently endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development of nearly all vascular diseases.

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Exercise Linked to More Diverse Intestinal Microbiome

Athletes, particularly those at the top of their profession appear to be are big winners when it comes to their gut microflora. A recent paper suggests that exercise has a direct effect on microbial composition and related gastrointestinal health. The article ‘Exercise and associated dietary extremes impact on gut microbial diversity’ was published in the international journal GUT.[1]

The relationship among the gut microbiota, exercise and related dietary changes has received much less attention. Loss of community richness/biodiversity has been demonstrated in obesity studies while increased diversity, which has been advocated to promote stability and improved ecosystem performance, is associated with increased health in certain populations. This has led to the suggestion that microbiota diversity could become a new biomarker for health status. It has been suggested that monitoring the gut microbiota annually to determine changes in the composition and stability could be sufficient to detect health status changes.

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Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease.[1] Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light: dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome.

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