Abstracts

What You Eat May Affect Your Body’s Internal Biological Clock

Source : Cell Press

Food not only nourishes the body but also affects its internal biological clock, which regulates the daily rhythm of many aspects of human behaviour and biology. Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell Reports provide new insights into how adjusting the clock through dietary manipulation may help patients with various conditions and show that insulin may be involved in resetting the clock.[1]

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Vit C For Heart Health

In a paper published in the journal Atherosclerosis, the authors of the published article – Effect of vitamin C on endothelial function in health and disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.[1]  identified a specific improvement in one aspect related to arterial/vascular health, namely endothelial function.

The normal artery contains three layers. The inner layer, the tunica intima, is lined by a monolayer of endothelial cells (EC) that is in contact with blood. The middle layer, or tunica media, contains smooth muscle cells embedded in a complex extracellular matrix. The adventitia, the outer layer of artery, contains mast cells, nerve endings and microvessels. The direct contact of ECs with the blood flow means that they are particularly vulnerable to damage molecules in the blood on one hand, and that they have ideally “guard” roles on the other hand (i.e., sensing alterations in perfusate constituents and either responding directly or transmitting reactive signals to nearby cells, such as smooth vascular cells).

Consequently endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development of nearly all vascular diseases.

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Exercise Linked to More Diverse Intestinal Microbiome

Athletes, particularly those at the top of their profession appear to be are big winners when it comes to their gut microflora. A recent paper suggests that exercise has a direct effect on microbial composition and related gastrointestinal health. The article ‘Exercise and associated dietary extremes impact on gut microbial diversity’ was published in the international journal GUT.[1]

The relationship among the gut microbiota, exercise and related dietary changes has received much less attention. Loss of community richness/biodiversity has been demonstrated in obesity studies while increased diversity, which has been advocated to promote stability and improved ecosystem performance, is associated with increased health in certain populations. This has led to the suggestion that microbiota diversity could become a new biomarker for health status. It has been suggested that monitoring the gut microbiota annually to determine changes in the composition and stability could be sufficient to detect health status changes.

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Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease.[1] Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light: dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome.

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Power Packed Proline Peptides Restore Immune Balance

Forty years ago in Poland, scientists isolated an unusual immune modulating substance derived from colostrum. It seemed to be potent at fighting infection, but equally potent at calming inflammation. At the time the researchers simply called it colostrinin, but after a sequence analysis of its peptides (short chains of amino acids bound by peptide bonds), they concluded that colostrinin contained at least 32 different peptides, many of which were rich in proline.

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Looking Back: Tocotrienols in Review

April of 2013 FOCUS introduced the latest research on mixed tocotrienols from organic virgin red palm oil, and in November 2013 we further explored these novel molecules. We feel the quote from Bharat B. Agarwahl, PhD, of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, sums it up well: “Tocotrienols exhibit health benefits quite different from that of tocopherols, and in most cases, these activities are superior for human use. Promising oral agents like tocotrienols are bioavailable, work on multiple pathways, and are already recognised as safe.”

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Lipid Replacement Therapy Makes Solid Scientific News

The Singer-Nicolson Fluid-Mosaic Model of the cell’s lipid membrane is making scientific news again. The model, along with clinical evidence for the effectiveness of oral lipid replacement therapy (LRT), has recently been the subject of several peer review scientific papers. LRT is proving to be a valid method for restoring lipid membranes damaged by chronic infection and oxidative stress. New articles by Garth Nicolson, PhD and Michael Ash, DO, ND, BSc appear in Elsevier’s Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, and articles by Dr. Nicolson also appear in the newly Harvard-launched journal, Discoveries, as well as Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. Here, we summarize the clinical findings.

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Beans, Peas, Lentils Can Significantly Reduce ‘Bad Cholesterol’ And Risk Of Heart Disease

Eating just 1 serving daily of legumes such as beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas can significantly reduce “bad cholesterol” and the risk of heart disease, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).[1]

High cholesterol levels are commonly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, yet in the main they are modifiable through diet and other lifestyle choices. Most chronic disease prevention guidelines recommend consumption of non–oil-seed legumes (dietary pulses) such as beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas along with other vegetables and fruits as part of a healthy diet, although they have not made specific recommendations based on direct lipid-lowering benefits.

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Anal gas evacuation and colonic microbiota in patients with flatulence: effect of diet

Conclusions Patients complaining of flatulence have a poor tolerance of intestinal gas, which is associated with instability of the microbial ecosystem.[1]

Significance of this study

What is already known on this subject?

Faecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

The use of faecal transplantation as a therapeutic tool for not only Clostridium Difficile Infection but as a mechanism for changing the composition of colonic microbiota for the purpose of resolving numerous persistent inflammatory conditions is starting to gain increased interest in the research and medical communities.

Medscape recently published a summary of many of the key areas and I have extracted and edited a small section for peoples review.

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