Once Broken; Difficult To Fix Microbiomes Have Long Term Consequences

The gut microbiomes of young children appear to fail to fully recover from the trauma of early-life malnourishment, even after they are treated with more-complete diets, according to a 2014 study published in Nature.[1]

In this paper the research team led by Jeffrey Gordon of the Washington University in St. Louis sampled the gut microbiomes of healthy and malnourished children in Bangladesh and discovered that the microbiomes of children who were underfed and whose diets lacked essential nutrients looked less like those of adults and more like those of younger, healthy children.

The findings present a possible explanation for the commonly observed complications that malnourished children suffer even after they are treated with a standardised food regimen, including stunted growth, cognitive delays, and immune system problems. The researchers have suggested that the immature gut microbiomes of malnourished children may be partially responsible for some of these long-term impairments.

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Shorter Sleepers Are Over-Eaters

Children who sleep less found to eat more

Young children who sleep less eat more, which can lead to obesity and related health problems later in life, reports a new study by UCL researchers.

The study found that 16 month-old children who slept for less than 10 hours each day consumed on average 105kcal more per day than children who slept for more than 13 hours. This is an increase of around 10% from 982kcal to 1087kcal.

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Honey- Sweet Option for Treating Cough in Children

Honey is more effective than a placebo in controlling night time cough in children with upper respiratory infections (URI), according to the results from a new randomised placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. The results were published online August 6 in Pediatrics.[1]

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Vitamin D and Children

Suggestions for Vitamin D supplementation and children

The need for oral vitamin D supplementation depends on the latitude of the child’s place of residence and the frequency of sunlight exposure as well as the time and timing. This summary chart makes suggestions concerning weight, rather than age to assist with making a clinical decision.

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Antibiotics and IBD in Childhood

Inflammatory Bowel Disease such as Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s blight people’s lives and restrict their functionality. The formative years of our lives represents the time when microbiological partnerships are being formed to provide lifelong co-dependence on each other. The role of the microbiota in immune tolerance in the gut and elsewhere is increasingly understood but is still an area rich for investigation.

In this study of Danish children a nationwide cohort study was conducted of all Danish singleton children born from 1995 to 2003 (N=577,627) with individual-level information on filled antibiotic prescriptions, IBD and potential confounding variables.[1] Using Poisson regression, rate ratios (RRs) of IBD were calculated according to antibiotic use. Antibiotic use was classified according to time since use, type, number of courses used and age at use.

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Does Junk Food increase the risk of Allergies and IBD?

As discussed here on many occasions it is well recognised that developed countries are suffering from an epidemic rise in immunologic disorders, such as allergy-related diseases and certain auto-immunities. One of the proposed explanations and one that I feel most convinced about is the changing composition of our intestinal microflora and parasite burden. Our intestinal ecological changes  appear to be altering our ability to manage appropriate immunomodulatory responses to various ingested and inhaled antigens.

The Proceedings of The National Academy of Science Journal published a paper this June 2010 exploring the differences in the microbial communities between those children on a western style diet and those from a rural African community whose diet reflected that of a the early humans – high in fibre.[1]

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