Selected Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Research Abstracts

Symbiosis between the gastrointestinal microbiota and the host is the basis for these health

benefits. In exchange for a stable environment and adequate nutrients, the microbiota play a role in maturation of the gastrointestinal tract, provide the host with nutritional contributions and help safeguard the host from harmful microbes. When this symbiosis is disturbed, introduction of naturally occurring intestinal microflora, like Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, can assist in re-establishing homeostasis and optimal function.

 

To assist practitioners in the recovery of research papers that have utilised LGG as a primary organism for the determination of effects and outcomes, we hope this document will prove useful.

Feeding Gut Microbiota: Nutrition & Probiotics Are Key Factors For Digestive Health

“Diet is a central issue when it comes to preserving our gastrointestinal health, because by eating and digesting we literally feed our gut microbiota, and thus influence its diversity and composition,” says the distinguished microbiota expert Professor Francisco Guarner (University Hospital Valld’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain).

If this balance is disturbed, it might result in a number of disorders, including functional bowel disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases and other immune mediated diseases, such as coeliac disease and certain allergies. Also, metabolic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, and perhaps even behavioural disorders, such as autism and depression, can be linked to gut microbial imbalances. Although a disrupted microbial equilibrium can have many causes — infectious pathogens or use of antibiotics among them — the role of our daily food and lifestyle is crucial. Thus, the maintenance of our gastrointestinal health is to a considerable extent in our own hands.

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Microbiota Modulate Behavioral and Physiological Abnormalities Associated with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

A very exciting paper published in the journal Cell has identified (in an animal model) the ability of commensal bacteria to reverse autistic behaviours, reinforcing the indications explored by us in the blog over the last few years that the relationship between brain and gut is in part mediated by organisational complexity and competence in the gut microbiota. This looks to be an exciting investigation that will build on many others works.[1]

Doses of a human gut microbe helped to reverse behavioural problems in mice with autism-like symptoms, researchers report today in Cell. The treatment also reduced gastrointestinal problems in the animals that were similar to those that often accompany autism in humans.

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The Gut Microbiota and ME/CFS

A paper out in the journal Anaerobe explores the potential role of our commensal bacteria and the development and progression of chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis.[1]

Developing a theme started in part by the Australian scientist Thomas Borody and colleagues[2] in which they utilised the method of faecal transplant therapy and identified that 70% of the patients responded initially and after a prolonged follow up period ((15-20 years) found that 58% had a sustained response, suggesting that the relationship between bacteria in the digestive tract and symptoms of CFIDS may have a credible mechanism for intervention.

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Probiotics Reduce Hepatic Encephalopathy Risk by 50%

At the International Liver Congress 2013: 48th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL). An abstract was presented exploring the role of probiotics in the reduction of risk for development of hepatic encephalopathy Abstract 78. Presented April 26, 2013.

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Antibiotics – Unintended Consequences; Microbiota and Immunity Suffer

Your gastrointestinal tract is home to complex microbial populations, which, collectively, are referred to as the microbiota. The relation between the microbiota and you – the host is meant to be symbiotic, with you providing a warm moist physical niche and suitable food to intestinal bacteria and then if all works well you in turn gain benefit from the enhancement of resistance to infection and the improved facilitation of the absorption of ingested food [1],[2]

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Probiotics Consumed During Pregnancy And Breast Feeding Reduces Risk Of Eczema In The Infant

For a number of years I have written, lectured, discussed and treated people with the emerging confidence that the application of benign, but signalling specific human derived bacteria would have benefits in terms of mucosal tolerance. One of the areas I have been most interested in has been the use of lactic acid bacteria as an immune modifying organism. As the first 1,000 days of a human’s life represent the ones in which immune activity is most responsive, the implication is that early stage supplementation – even in utero supplementation will have a modifying effect on some risk factors associated with a loss of mucosal tolerance.

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Fatigue, Immunity and Inflammation:– Their Resolution Using Natural Medicine.

Michael E. Ash BSc DO ND, Robert Settenari M.S and Prof. Garth L. Nicolson Ph.D explain the relationship between energy deficit, mitochondrial membrane quality, the immune system, inflammation and how to recover from persistent fatigue using validated natural medicine.

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Probiotics Can Make Dendritic Cells Stop Singing the Blues

GUT is one of my favourite journals, as they regularly explore the ‘alternative’ approaches to colon health management with a vigour that appeases the clinician in me, and a rigour that calms the scientist.

A paper published in early 2012[1] add’s further knowledge to the role that probiotics and the active components produced by lactic acid bacteria have on mucosal health and intestinal balance. An especially pleasing discovery – for an old long term user of this word – is their inclusion of the term dysbiosis, with a summary explanation in the opening paragraph, as there is no abstract. I have reproduced it below:

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The Potential Role of Probiotics in the Management of Childhood Autism Spectrum Disorders

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are defined by impairments in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions, and repetitive and stereotyped behaviours. In addition to these core deficits, previous reports indicate that the prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms ranges widely in individuals with ASD, from 9 to 91% in different study population.[1]

The role of probiotics in the management and treatment of these alterations has been explored in a recent free access paper, published in Gastroenterology Research and Practice Oct 2011.[2]

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