Stress Reduction Through Meditation May Aid In Slowing The Progression Of Alzheimer’s Disease

A pilot study shows promise for age-related cognitive diseases

The results of the study appeared online October 10 in Neuroscience Letters.[1]

It’s well known that the brains of mediators change, but it’s not entirely clear what those changes mean or how the changes might benefit the mediator. A new pilot study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre suggests that the brain changes associated with meditation and stress reduction may play an important role in slowing the progression of age-related cognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia’s.

Read the rest of this page »

Chronic Stress Increases Infection Susceptibility

It will come as no surprise to practitioners and clinicians that something goes awry with our immune systems capacity for protection in the face of chronic stress. Ironically in short acute stress responses our immune system benefits from increase defence responses and allows most of us to present a more robust series of immune related decisions.

Back in the early 1990’s a team of researchers from the Carnegie Mellon University published a paper in the New England Journal of Medicine stating that psychological stress was associated in a dose-response manner with an increased risk of acute infectious respiratory illness, and that this risk was attributable to increased rates of infection, rather than to an increased frequency of symptoms post infection.[1]

Read the rest of this page »

L-Theanine Reduces Anxiety – Quickly

L-theanine is an amino acid found in tea leaves. Previous studies of dietary supplements of L-theanine have suggested a therapeutic benefit in reducing stress, promoting relaxation, and improving the quality of sleep.

Akiko Higashiyama, from University of Shiga Prefecture (Japan), and colleagues have found that daily L-theanine supplementation at 200 mg/day helps people with anxiety to focus on their daily activities.  The researchers recruited 18 healthy University students and assessed their anxiety levels using a standardised rating scale.  Student with high anxiety were put in one group, while students with minimal anxiety were put in another group. Both groups received water or water plus 200 mg of L-theanine per 100 ml of water. [1]

Read the rest of this page »

Dr James Wilson – Recovering from Adverse Stress & Fatigue

Dr James WilsonOn the weekend of October 16th & 17th this year, Dr James Wilson is travelling from Arizona to present a seminar and workshop combination at The Royal Society of Medicine, London on “Recovering from Adverse Stress & Fatigue”.

The Autumn Seminar aims to provide a vital update of information beyond Dr. Wilson’s book ‘Adrenal Fatigue – The 21st Century Stress Syndrome’.

More about Dr Wilson’s Seminar

PEA – a Natural Antidepressant

Phenylethylamine (PEA) is the compound found in chocolate that is thought to produce its positive effects on mood. Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) is a particular strain of blue green algae that has been found to have many times more PEA than chocolate. Numerous studies have demonstrated PEA’s efficacy for depression and ADHD, and some scientists say that it may even be responsible for the brain chemicals involved with love and monogamy.

AFA/PEA: Blue Green Algae Supercharged with Phenylethylamine

AFA/PEA is a concentrated liquid blue green algae aphanizomenon flosaquae (AFA) that has been found to have very high levels of phenylethylamine (PEA). PEA is the same compound that is found in chocolate and thought to produce chocolate’s pleasurable effects on mood; however AFA/PEA contains many times more PEA than chocolate. Studies demonstrate phenylethylamine’s efficacy as an anti-depressant, and its effectiveness for ADHD, as well as being involved with “runner’s high” and even the chemicals responsible for romantic love.

Read the rest of this page »

Dark Chocolate Vs. Stress – The Dark Side Wins!

UnknownDietary preferences influence basal human metabolism and gut microbiome activity that in turn may have long-term health consequences. The present study reports the metabolic responses of free living subjects to a daily consumption of 40 g of dark chocolate for up to 14 days.

A clinical trial was performed on a population of 30 human subjects, who were classified in low and high anxiety traits using validated psychological questionnaires. Biological fluids (urine and blood plasma) were collected during 3 test days at the beginning, midtime and at the end of a 2 week study. NMR and MS-based metabonomics were employed to study global changes in metabolism due to the chocolate consumption.

Read the rest of this page »

Anxiety & Fatigue Respond to Natural Agent Better Than to Benzodiazepines

cover-mediumUse of benzodiazepine anti-anxiety drugs (like Valium) reached epidemic proportions two decades ago, the use of which was enshrined in the Rolling Stones song ‘Mothers Little Helper’. While long-term side effects have led to a significant decrease in use in recent times, modern benzodiazepine derivatives are still widely prescribed.

Drugs vs. Nutrients
Although nutritional approaches to anxiety have not seen much use by the medical profession, consumers have obtained some degree of anxiolytic relief through the use of such OTC items as B-complex vitamins, magnesium, GABA, and herbs like valerian.

Read the rest of this page »

We use cookies and similar tools across our websites to improve their performance and enhance your user experience. Learn more about our Cookies Policy and click I understand, to hide this message.