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Dr’s Make Blood Pressure Soar!

Wednesday, 12 May 2010 by

In the ever increasing fight against vascular disease and related health problems the role of the silent marker – Blood Pressure has always been regarded as a sentinel sign. The levels determined to be safe have been adjusted over the years to try and develop a public and medical policy towards compression of risk. Therefore nurses and Dr’s perform clinic blood pressure tests to look for indications of different states of hypertension. This study from the BMJ indicates who and how, has significant effects on results/intervention.[1]

Approaches to Curing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Fibromyalgia, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Gulf War Syndrome and Possibly Many Others by Martin L. Pall, PhD

From the Townsend Letter
February / March 2010

Abstract

The NO/ONOO− cycle is a biochemical vicious cycle that is thought to cause such diseases as chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), fibromyalgia (FM), and possibly a large number of other chronic inflammatory diseases. The chemistry/biochemistry of the cycle predicts that the primary mechanism is local such the depending on where it is localized in the body, it may cause a variety of different diseases. Previous studies have shown that agents that lower such cycle elements as oxidative stress, nitric oxide, inflammatory responses, mitochondrial dysfunction, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) depletion and NMDA activity produce clinical improvements in CFS/ME and FM patients, consistent with the predictions of the cycle mechanism. Multiagent protocols lowering several aspects of the cycle appear to be the most promising approaches to therapy. These include an entirely over-the-counter nutritional support protocol developed by the author in conjunction with the Allergy Research Group. However, such

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Like previous epidemic and pandemic diseases, 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) may pose an increased risk of severe illness in pregnant women. To see if there were clinical experiences that matched this assumption a Californian investigation by their Department of Health reviewed demographic and clinical data reported from April 23 through August 11, 2009, for all H1N1-infected, reproductive-age women who were hospitalised or died. These included non-pregnant women, pregnant women, and postpartum women (those who had delivered ≤2 weeks previously).[1]

coverA new twist to the hygiene hypothesis shows that allergic risk can also be modulated by microbial exposure before birth. Mice born to dams that were exposed to bacteria during pregnancy were less likely to develop allergic responses than those born to unexposed mothers. And maternal Toll-like receptor (TLR) signals were required for the transmission of protection.

TLRs are a type of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and recognise molecules that are broadly shared by pathogens but distinguishable from host molecules, collectively referred to as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs).

525013Treatment based on resveratrol could be a safer alternative to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women and could help prevent breast cancer, according to a new study.

The findings of the study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry indicate that resveratrol is the most likely candidate of the phytoestrogens to offer safer HRT and chemoprevention of breast cancer due to its oestrogenic activity and high antitumour activity.

Phytoestrogens are natural plant substances found in food that exert weak oestrogen-like activity toward mammals, such as daidzein, genistein and glycitein found in soybeans and soy products, coumestrol in mung bean and alfalfa sprouts and resveratrol in grape skins and red wine.

Herbal Adaptogens For Asthma and Adrenal Function

Wednesday, 25 November 2009 by | Comments: 12

A Blend of Unique Herbs May Have Wide Clinical Application

Focus - Allergy Research Group NewsletterIn 2006  a landmark study from the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York, the Weifang Asthma Hospital and the Weifang School of Medicine in China reported on a novel blend of Chinese herbs (named ASHMI) that proved statistically as effective as steroids in alleviating asthma symptoms. Now we report more fully on these unique adaptogenic herbs, which may have far wider application than asthma alone. There were preliminary indications that this formula may in fact restore adrenal function, and thus be useful in relationship to many chronic illnesses associated with adrenal fatigue. Highlights of the new information we include in this article:

Confused About Abdominal Bloating? – No More!

Friday, 13 November 2009 by | Comments: 5

adominalMichael Ash BSc(Hons).DO. ND. FDipION reviews the current understanding behind bloating and distension.

The unpleasant symptoms of bloating and abdominal distension are common and bothersome, affecting up to 96% of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (such as IBS) and an estimated 30% of the general population. Clear pathophysiologic explanations have been lacking and available treatment options can appear contradictory and ineffective. Treatments will be explored in a follow up review.

In December 2008, IFM had the opportunity to film an interview between Dr. Jeffrey Bland and Dr. Abram Hoffer, a founding father of orthomolecular medicine and recipient of the 14th Linus Pauling Functional Medicine Award. Excerpts from this video first aired at last May’s symposium on mood disorders on the day following news of his death at age 91.

In honour of Dr. Hoffer and his lifetime of work advancing the fields of psychiatry and functional medicine, The Institue of functional Medicine is making this video available to you on their website.

Blastocystis hominis. Is It Really A Problem?

Thursday, 15 October 2009 by | Comments: 84
Blastocystis hominis cyst-like forms in a wet mount stained in iodine

Blastocystis hominis cyst-like forms in a wet mount stained in iodine

Problem?

Michael Ash BSc DO ND FDipION reviews the latest studies on this pathogen.

Blastocystis is an unusual enteric protozoan parasite of humans and many animals. It has a worldwide distribution and is often the most commonly isolated organism in parasitological surveys. The parasite has been described since the early 1900s, but only in the last decade or so have there been significant advances in the understanding of Blastocystis biology.

vrm-coverIodine deficiency epidemic

Although most of us believe we are not deficient in iodine since the fortification of salt with iodine, the fact is most people are deficient and don’t know it. Due to changes in food intake, eating patterns and food production methods, iodine intake has been decreasing in the U.S. since the early 70’s. Even worse, we are exposed to increasing levels of environmental toxins that either block the absorption of iodine or block its actions in the body.

Author: Joseph Pizzorno, ND Source: Vitamin Retailer Magazine, November 2009

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