Detection of herpes viruses and parvovirus B19 in gastric and intestinal mucosa of chronic fatigue syndrome patients.

BACKGROUND: Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6), Epstein-Barr virus and parvovirus B19 have been suggested as aetiological agents of chronic fatigue syndrome but none of these viruses is consistently detected in all patients. However, active viral infections may be localised in specific tissues, and, therefore, are not easily detectable. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of HHV-6, HHV-7, EBV and parvovirus B19 in the gastro-intestinal tract of CFS patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using real-time PCR, viral DNA loads were quantified in gastro-intestinal biopsies of 48 CFS patients and 35 controls.

RESULTS: High loads of HHV-7 DNA were detected in most CFS and control biopsies. EBV and HHV-6 were detected in 15-30% of all biopsies. Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected in 40% of the patients versus less than 15% of the controls.

CONCLUSION: Parvovirus B19 may be involved in the pathogenesis of CFS, at least for a subset of patients. The gastro-intestinal tract appears as an important reservoir of infection for several potentially pathogenic viruses.

Frémont M, Metzger K, Rady H, Hulstaert J, De Meirleir K. Detection of herpesviruses and parvovirus B19 in gastric and intestinal mucosa of chronic fatigue syndrome patients. In Vivo. 2009 Mar-Apr;23(2):209-13. View Abstract

Comment: The mucosal immune system is the site of the greatest innate immune activity in the body. The presence of dysbiosis can lead to activated cytokines and NFkB a pro inflammatory gene set of over 400 that increase inflammation. Chronic inflammation is linked with CFS including the NO-NOO cycle postulated by Dr Pall.

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